Monthly Archives: March 2017

Adventures in sewing, continued

“30 minute skirt” HAHAHAHAHAHA allow me to wipe away tears of laughter. NO. Unless you’re an “amateur” seamstress the way the people on The Great British Baking Show are “amateur” bakers, and then sure, 30 minutes. For me, an actual amateur (as in beginner, not as in “I could be doing this professionally and getting paid for it, I just happen not to be”), it took about three and a half hours in two separate sessions – one in September, and one in March, because in between we moved house and everything unrelated to that was  on hold.

I did take the “30 minute” part of the description with a large grain of salt, because I am so new to sewing, and I’m sure if I made a skirt from this pattern again, it would take a little less time. But between the measuring, cutting, ironing, pinning, and actual sewing (and troubleshooting the sewing machine), I can’t imagine doing one start to finish in less than an hour.

Modeling skirt with black top, leggings, and bootsThe instructions were clear and fairly easy to follow. I used a jersey fabric and a slightly wider elastic than was called for (I had it on hand for another pattern I was planning to make, but made this one instead). The skirt came out well enough – the seams and hem are even, and it more or less fits – but I let the fabric get bunched up in a couple places when I was sewing the elastic into the waistband, creating some unintentional and asymmetrical pleat-like things. However, they don’t affect the fall of the skirt too badly, and whatever top I wear with the skirt is likely to cover it up.

For a first effort, I’m calling it a success. I wore it to work and it’s very comfortable – which is the most important part!

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More tasty things in the kitchen

Tasty things we made in December

Sweet potato casserole (adapted from The America’s Test Kitchen Family Cookbook)

Ingredients
8 Tbsp butter
5 sweet potatoes
Less than 1/3 cup each of brown sugar, molasses, and maple syrup*
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
Pecans for topping (optional)

*The original recipe called for 1 cup of packed brown sugar, and also 5 lbs of potatoes; a few of my potatoes were probably under a pound, but even so, that seemed like a lot of sugar. I replaced some of the sugar with other sweeteners, about 1/4 cup of each – you could definitely cut back even more and this would still be a very sweet dish.

Instructions
Peel and cut sweet potatoes into chunks. Melt butter in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sweet potatoes, sugar/molasses/syrup, water, salt, and pepper; bring to a simmer, then reduce heat to medium-low and cover. Cook, stirring often, until the potatoes are tender, 30-45 minutes. Preheat the oven to 450.

Remove the lid and bring the potato mixture to a simmer; gently mash the potatoes into the liquid with a potato masher. Chop the pecans and spread them over the top of the potato mixture, then bake 10 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool just long enough so that you don’t burn your mouth on the first bite.

Olive oil cake with lemon and ginger (adapted from Smitten Kitchen’s Blood Orange Olive Oil Cake)

We made the blood orange olive oil cake, and it was very good, but it will be years before I “supreme” a citrus fruit again. Make the same cake using lemon zest and juice instead of orange, and add about 1/2 cup of chopped crystallized ginger, and it’s an easier and equally delicious cake.

Green casserole a.k.a. secret spinach casserole (adapted from The America’s Test Kitchen Family Cookbook)

Very adapted: I actually used the ATK recipe for fettuccine alfredo sauce, added a cube of last summer’s frozen pesto and a whole bag of spinach (turned into green paste with a little bit of olive oil in the food processor), and used this green sauce mixture to coat cooked (al dente) rigatoni pasta, which I then baked in a 9×13 casserole dish at 350 for about 20 minutes. Grate some extra cheese over the top if you like (and who doesn’t like?).

Oatmeal walnut raisin cranberry cookies (from Baking With Less Sugar by Joanne Chang)

These are good if you think of them as breakfast cookies instead of dessert cookies.

A note on crystallized ginger and raisins, vis a vis toddlers: our kid is wild about these. I just heard you’re not supposed to give raisins to kids under three because they are a choking hazard, but they are very small raisins, and she’s been fine so far. And she brushes her (many, many, I think about 80 now?) teeth. As for the ginger…neither her dad nor I can handle eating a whole piece of ginger, but apparently she has a much higher spice/heat tolerance than we do!

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Written on stone

A small stone sitting on a wall. On the stone is written "Be kind. Everyone matters."

“Be kind. Everyone matters.”

Noticed this little stone resting on top of a wall on my walk back from the playground last week.

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Filed under arts and crafts, politics